‘Talk With Each Other in a Way That Heals, Not in a Way That Wounds’

A little over six years ago a man with a gun went on a shooting spree in a supermarket parking lot, killing six people and seriously wounding then-Representative Gabriel Giffords.

Today the news is consumed with the shooting at a ballpark that wounded Representative Steve Scalise. I always avoid writing about these incidents as they are unfolding. That is partially out of respect, but also a matter of wanting to wait until we have all of the facts.

In the meantime, I thought it might be interesting to go back and read what President Obama said at the memorial service in the aftermath of the Tucson shooting. I’m not surprised that it is exactly what I needed to hear at this moment. So I’ll share it with all of you.

You see, when a tragedy like this strikes, it is part of our nature to demand explanations –- to try and pose some order on the chaos and make sense out of that which seems senseless.  Already we’ve seen a national conversation commence, not only about the motivations behind these killings, but about everything from the merits of gun safety laws to the adequacy of our mental health system.  And much of this process, of debating what might be done to prevent such tragedies in the future, is an essential ingredient in our exercise of self-government.

But at a time when our discourse has become so sharply polarized -– at a time when we are far too eager to lay the blame for all that ails the world at the feet of those who happen to think differently than we do -– it’s important for us to pause for a moment and make sure that we’re talking with each other in a way that heals, not in a way that wounds.

Scripture tells us that there is evil in the world, and that terrible things happen for reasons that defy human understanding. In the words of Job, “When I looked for light, then came darkness.”  Bad things happen, and we have to guard against simple explanations in the aftermath.

For the truth is none of us can know exactly what triggered this vicious attack.  None of us can know with any certainty what might have stopped these shots from being fired, or what thoughts lurked in the inner recesses of a violent man’s mind.  Yes, we have to examine all the facts behind this tragedy.  We cannot and will not be passive in the face of such violence.  We should be willing to challenge old assumptions in order to lessen the prospects of such violence in the future.  But what we cannot do is use this tragedy as one more occasion to turn on each other. That we cannot do. That we cannot do.

As we discuss these issues, let each of us do so with a good dose of humility.  Rather than pointing fingers or assigning blame, let’s use this occasion to expand our moral imaginations, to listen to each other more carefully, to sharpen our instincts for empathy and remind ourselves of all the ways that our hopes and dreams are bound together.

from novemoore http://ift.tt/2ri5clj

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